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How much exercise does a Siberian Husky need?

Siberian Huskies are an eye-catching, athletic, intelligent breed. They can pose quite a challenge for first-time owners because of their powerful brains and sensitivity. Although they’re an independent breed, they love being part of a pack so are happiest when they have company and aren’t left on their own too much. They’re great for experienced, work-from-home dog owners who love to get out and walk. 

How much exercise does an adult Siberian Husky need? 

Huskies would happily run all day long given the opportunity, so it’s important that you make sure they’re getting exactly the right amount. Aim for at least 80 minutes every day, and you’ll want to make sure that a good chunk of that time is made up of them running.

As well as their physical exercise needs, your Husky needs to keep their brians active too. Why not play enrichment games throughout the day to keep them from howling the house down?

Not sure of the best way to keep track of what they’ve been up to? Time to PitPat up. We’ll give you an exercise goal tailored to your dog, and you’ll be able to monitor all their activity 24/7. Simple.

Husky running through woods

How much exercise does a Siberian Husky puppy need?

Although even as a puppy they’re active dogs, 5 minutes of formal walkies a day for each month of their life can be enough exercise for Husky puppies. Getting too much exercise at this stage could cause joint and bone issues in later life, which no owner wants for their dog.

At this age, walkies are more about experiencing the world around them than getting exercise, so make sure they have plenty of opportunities to sniff and explore new things.

As your Husky puppy gets older the amount of exercise they need will increase. But by how much? With PitPat there’s no need to guess. Just download our free app and it will automatically adjust your pup’s goal as they grow.

How much exercise does a senior Siberian Husky need? 

As we get older, the amount of exercise we do often reduces. So why would it be any different for your dog? 

You may notice your pup slowing down on walks, being less active around the house or looking a little stiff after a long walk. If this does happen, it might be time to think about how you can reduce their exercise.

Consider reducing the number of walks you do in a day, or letting your dog set the pace of walks. Aim to help them gradually reduce the amount and intensity of their exercise with shorter, more frequent walks rather than the marathon distance runs that they love.

Laughing Husky with sky in background

Best types of exercise for Siberian Huskies

Canicross – Huskies just love to pull, and could run all day given the option. Canicross started as a way to keep working sled dogs in shape in the off season, and it’s a great physical and mental exercise for you and your dog. Grab a waist belt, lead and harness and let them pull you around the tracks.

Bikejoring – Much like Canicross, Bikejoring is a sport developed to help keep sled dogs fit. But instead of pulling their runner along, they are attached to your bicycle. It requires some special equipment to get started, and you’ll need good balance, but it can be incredibly fulfilling for you both.

Agility – Weaving in and out of cones, jumping over hurdles, and running through tunnels is a great type of dog training for mental stimulation, which these guys need plenty of.

Life with a Siberian Husky is always easier when you know they’re getting just the right amount of exercise. With a PitPat Dog Activity Monitor you’ll know exactly how much they’re doing every day – and whether they need a little extra to keep them fit and healthy.

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